Author Topic: RM Young 05103V-45 to Arduino/ Raspberry Pi  (Read 795 times)

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Offline andrewrckt

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RM Young 05103V-45 to Arduino/ Raspberry Pi
« on: September 12, 2018, 01:21:40 PM »
Hi Everyone,

This is my first post here, but I have been reading on this forum for quite some time.  I am a bit of an anemometer collector and have several units on my property (RM Young 05103, RM Young Sentry, Davis VP2, DownEaster).  All of the anemometers I have collected so far have come with some kind of interface to poll the data from the instrument (RM Young uses the DVP2 Universal Anemometer Transmitter).

I have recently purchased an RM Young 05103V-45 from ebay so I can learn how to code in Python/ SQL to poll the data to a web server.  My question is if anyone has experience hooking up the 05103V-45 to a Raspberry Pi (with an ADC) or Arduino (which should sense the analog signal directly)?  I am not 100% sure how to wire the instrument to the Arduino.  From my understanding, the instrument needs a power supply hook up of 8-24 VDC, so a simple power supply should suffice.  I know I will need to sense the voltage generated on the Wind Speed and Wind Direction voltage output.  Do I sense these voltages directly with the Arduino?  Also, I am unfamiliar how to handle the Output and Voltage references.  Not 100% sure what these do besides give a basis for comparison.  Now, what I could do is either sense the pulses generated from the 3 pole magnet or direct voltage as both are linearly proportional to the wind speed.  Any thoughts here?

My main concern here, isn't learning by testing, but accidentally shorting out the instrument.  If anyone has any experience with the wiring, I would love to hear how you did it!

Anyways, I look forward to learning more.

Andrew

« Last Edit: September 12, 2018, 01:31:25 PM by andrewrckt »

Offline DaleReid

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Re: RM Young 05103V-45 to Arduino/ Raspberry Pi
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2018, 04:59:45 PM »
By me responding please don't consider my remarks as 'experienced' in this field.
You and I were looking at many of the same items on eBay, I guess.  I passed on the unit because it was a voltage output device, and I have nothing to hook it to other than some WindTrackers that use the 0-5 volts out.

However, you are apparently more adventuresome and with your familiarity with Arduino or Rasp PI, you should be ready to go quickly.

I cannot speak to the unit's invincibility to withstand reverse polarity hookup, so be careful.  The little screw terminations however are very robust and make hookup pretty simple.

A couple observations, which may help.  I'd feed it with 12 volts if you can.  Remember you have to send about 5 millamps, at 12v, up to it, so choose the heavier Belden type cable if you can. 22 gauge minimum.  With other types I've had 22 gauge cable run 150' easily. Remember to ground the shield to a ground on your Arduino or the power supply.

The downleads will have a voltage, as you noted, from 0 to 5.  I doubt you'll ever have a wind speed which will give you a 5 volt output, something over 150 knots if I recall.  And the current is miniscule, so the 22 gauge should be OK for that.  If you have the chance to scale the input to the Arudino, and can select up to 2.5 volts, you should fall within the range of most of the outputs you'll get from the unit.  And if my experience is correct, the values will be darned close to what you'd expect from a research grade instrument that new costs more than almost every Davis station there is.

With the voltage output, you'll avoid the sticky wicket of having to count pulses for a period and then do math to figure out how fast the wind is blowing.  And the shielding will help prevent any induced current, unless you are running a kilowatt ham radio rig near by, especially CW which has been a problem, but then again I seldom run CW and never more than 50 - 100 watts.  With the pulse type I have running unless you are mated to a Young translator or Wind Tracker, it seems random neighborhood noise plays tricks on the station's front end and I get occassional 90 mph gusts on calm days, so the voltage output should reduce or eliminate that possibility.



The wind direction will be 0-5 volts for the 360 degree span, so write your scaling code accordingly.  I have few with the voltage output, but many otherwise, and they all but one had the calibration sheet with it and when new, they are remarkably linear.  The manual says 13.9 mV per degree of indicated output.  And it says that 1 meter/second wind which is 2.2 mph is 50 mVolts and scales up above that, so 2.5 volts will be about 110 mph, at which point I'm in the basement under something heavy. 

The hookup is pretty clear, with shield of the Belden cable going to a ground, the Positive (12v is my recommendation, not 9v, with low ripple so use a good power supply) + power to the WHITE (they always seem to use white for positive power, not red, dunno why), Power REF is actually the ground or negative of the power supply (not quite the same thing, but close) and is BLACK (which makes sense) on their diagram. 

Output Ref (BROWN) is just the signal ground for both the wind speed and wind direction, so that one terminal does double duty for grounding or negative, and both the Wind Speed (RED) and Wind Direction (GREEN) reference  or compare against that terminal.  So to measure the Wind Speed, you measure from the RED to the BROWN and to measure the Wind Direction you measure from the GREEN to the BROWN.  Among all the Young stuff they refer to the ground or non-active terminal as a REFerence.  I know on some of the humidity modules I have the REF actually refers to a voltage above ground of 3+ volts or so, and somehow the internal goodies use that to generate a signal that is more accurate, rather than supply voltage.   Don't let that last sentence confuse you and if it does, just delete it.

I think you could be up and running in a few minutes.

I have an RM Young 28600 translator, which I hooked up with power supply, reference and WS and WD terminals, loaded about 15 lines of code and voila, I was looking at numbers.

You should do just fine. 

Can you let us know if you find my comments in error in your particular situation?
And of course let us know what you have for results and how you are going to display the output or feed it to some wx program with your Arduino or R-Pi?

I assume you got the manual with it or you found the right one on Young's site for the connection diagram?  Dale

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Offline andrewrckt

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Re: RM Young 05103V-45 to Arduino/ Raspberry Pi
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2018, 02:33:42 PM »
Thanks DaleReid!

Do you have a preferred power supply that would send the 12V 5mA at low ripple you were talking about? 

I can not wait for this to come in the mail, so I can start playing with it!!!  I was able to talk the seller down on that RM Young for $124 with shipping included on the 05103V-45.  Thought for that price point it was worth it!  Worst case, I dont figure this out and I just count pulses, as this would work as well.  I did some reading and I think the Campbell Sci data loggers count pulses on that type of anemometer, I could be wrong though!  Would love to get a CR1000x, but those are way too expensive.

How do you like the 28600 translator?  They are wicked expensive, but I can see justification for their use.  From your experience do they go on eBay fairly cheap at some points?

Thanks,
Andrew

Offline DaleReid

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Re: RM Young 05103V-45 to Arduino/ Raspberry Pi
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2018, 10:49:05 PM »
A thought I just had.  One of the stations I have that needs voltage for heaters up there is powered by an old laptop power supply.  Most put out 19v or even low 20s, so look at some.  We have a place here that recyles computer gear, and I got one given to me after I visited with the guy a bit.  But again you need to check the voltage carefully.  If you have such a place, take a good voltmeter along and ask the guys if you can check a few and maybe for a five spot get it. 

Otherwise I'd have to go looking at what I'd bought for a good supply.  Maybe the guys here who do a lot of stuff can recommend a good one.  I'd be a bit concerned about too much noise, and if you've got access to an oscilloscope you could look.

A fellow by the handle Cutty Sark Sailor with a lot of doings on the Blitzortung Lightning subforum tested a whole bunch but many were not for that voltage if I recall.

You did get a very very good deal on that wind monitor . I pays to watch and pays to ask, sometimes you come up with a great deal.

The more I think of it, the voltage out devices may be ideal for the way you want to use it.  I was looking at some arduino development for a wx station using the pulse type anemometers and the timing, especially at low speeds, is tough, so this may be a case for the voltage output devices.

The 28600 is a very rare beast, or so it seems.  I have two.  One is older, and neither has the newer version with the USB plug to program them.  The first I got by just being persistent checking the eBay listings for translators and for Young.  When this one showed up I hung in there and paid a bit for it.  I  had missed one a couple years earlier by not checking the time of sale end and it was gone, and for not much more than a couple hundred bucks, but still a chunk of change.  The second one was not advertised as such, it was a device mounted in a portable case that was being sold.  I recognized it, said nothing, and got the case for like a hundred bucks, plus, ouch, fifty shipping.  Once here it was an almost unused device, well mounted, professionally used (I looked at the programming in it) to measure 3D wind patterns on some monitoring tower.  I have a friend that does environmental stuff for refineries and he thought those were similar to the data points they'd use to analyze mixing at the various levels.  Anyway, I've never seen any others on eBay, so just keep watching, and it is worth just offering a Best Offer guy something for whatever they are selling. Not often, but a couple times I have been pleasantly surprised.  There is no way a new one is ever going to be within MY budget!  Research and heavy duty monitoring seems to be their big customers.

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