Author Topic: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions  (Read 54147 times)

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Offline DeKay

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #50 on: January 07, 2013, 07:47:55 PM »

Next step would be to pick up a BMP085 for humidity and a DHT22 for temperature / pressure.  These are five or six bucks each with free shipping on EBay and there are already existing Arduino libraries to drive them.  From there the Davis LOOP and a few other commands could be cloned and whammo... a DIY console minus the display suitable for connecting to Cumulus and the like.


The RFBee doesn't have enough horsepower to do the full emulation.  One of the ideas that I have is to use the RFBee as just another sensor attached to the I2C bus.  It's contents could be read just like a real time clock, BMP085 or the DHT22.  Then use a MEGA based unit to tie everything together.  Any thoughts on this approach?


Daisy-chaining arduinos just seems so wrong.  It is a shame these things aren't a little more capable.

What about scrapping the Arduino altogether and going with a straight CC1101 module running off a Raspberry Pi?  Because at the end of the day, you'll want to hook those two Arduino's up to something with real horsepower anyway.  Check out what is going on at JeeLabs these days.  Hang a bunch of raw sensors off the Pi which can then serve a web page so your phone takes the place of the console LCD.  The Pi could also push data out to someplace like wunderground, archive the data on a monster flash card or USB stick, collect data from other devices, etc.  Might be able to write all the code in Python as well (see here) to make things more accessible.

Thoughts on this approach?

Offline rdsman

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #51 on: January 08, 2013, 09:45:12 AM »
DeKay:

The RFBee is fully capable of being a stand-alone receiver.  It could be used to monitor an ISS and provide an alarm if the temp drops below freezing or windspeed exceeds 25 mph.  It could be used as a stand alone range extender (One of my goals).  You could hook a low cost serial or I2C display and
monitor your neighbor's ISS and really save some money!  I'm just not sure how well (if at all) it would perform trying to run a rtc, temp, humidity, etc
and process the Loop command.  The RFBee only has 16k of flash and 1k of sram.  I will attempt it, however.

I do like your idea with the Raspberry Pi, but I also like this:

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/dragrove-generic-gateway-for-internet-of-things-p-1118.html?cPath=139_141

Ray

Offline DeKay

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #52 on: January 08, 2013, 03:26:15 PM »
DeKay:

The RFBee is fully capable of being a stand-alone receiver.  It could be used to monitor an ISS and provide an alarm if the temp drops below freezing or windspeed exceeds 25 mph.  It could be used as a stand alone range extender (One of my goals). 

Or a standalone transmitter for a DIY temp / humidity station...

You could hook a low cost serial or I2C display and monitor your neighbor's ISS and really save some money! 

 8-)

I'm just not sure how well (if at all) it would perform trying to run a rtc, temp, humidity, etc
and process the Loop command.  The RFBee only has 16k of flash and 1k of sram.  I will attempt it, however.

You could always pile in the drivers for the DHT22 and BMP085 (both available at the AdaFruit website) and see how much room you have left to give you an idea of how much room you'd have for your own code.  Also, temp, humidity, and pressure don't need to be read very often.  I think the console does it every 50s or so.  That helps lightens the load.

Remember too that the processor in the console only runs at 1.8432 MHz.  You have clock speed on your side.

I do like your idea with the Raspberry Pi, but I also like this:

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/dragrove-generic-gateway-for-internet-of-things-p-1118.html?cPath=139_141


Hadn't seen that one before.  I'm assuming it just has an Arduino stuffed inside it somewhere, and you could still end up hitting the same limitations on code and data space?

Another thing I've bounced around in my head is extending their ISS protocol, essentially defining new station types or stuffing new things into the existing messages.  A Davis console would ignore what it didn't understand.  A DIY console would interpret these things as light sensor outputs or contact closures for home monitoring.

Sounds like you are keen to dig into the coding side so I'll see if I can dig more into the reverse engineering side of what is there already.  Unfortunately, my time is going to be pretty limited for the next six weeks.

Offline meteobreda

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Hello,

I'm searching information about Arduino and ISS connection.
My idea is use a ISS with no Console.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 03:00:15 PM by dma1968 »

Offline rdsman

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I'm searching information about Arduino and ISS connection.


This is what I have:

http://www.raydees.com/uploads/Davis.zip

It uses the RFBee from seeedstudio, which is Arduino based.   What we really need is the CC1101 on it's own breakout board without a processor attached.

Ray

Offline meteobreda

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #55 on: March 29, 2013, 04:33:44 PM »
Hi,

Not is necessary Arduino Uno or similar? or the module is plugged to Arduino card.
Please could you send a list of necessary materials.

Thank You.

Offline rdsman

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #56 on: March 30, 2013, 02:09:39 PM »
I used these two devices:

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/rfbee-v11-wireless-arduino-compatible-node-p-614.html?cPath=139_140

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/uartsbee-v4-p-688.html?cPath=132_135

They are all you need to get started decoding ISS transmissions.  I'm sure there are other products out there that would do just as well.
Ray

Offline meteobreda

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #57 on: March 30, 2013, 03:18:18 PM »
Hello,
This is for EU Davis?
868MHz is European or US Davis?  #-o
My Davis is US I think the frequency is 466MHz

Offline rdsman

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #58 on: March 30, 2013, 08:24:58 PM »
This pretty much explains it:

Code: [Select]
//
//  Table for FREQ2 settings.  (Vantage VUE - US 900 mHz)
//
static const uint8_t __attribute__ ((progmem)) FREQ_2[51] =
{
  0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23,
  0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23,
  0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x23,
  0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23,
  0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23, 0x22, 0x23,
  0x23
}; 

I don't know anything about the 466 mHz version.
Ray

Offline johnd

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #59 on: March 31, 2013, 05:42:43 AM »
There is no 466MHz version, just generic OV (eg EU) @ 868MHz, US in the 900MHz band (and, for completeness, AU and possibly NZ (not sure about NZ) in what I think is a shortened US band).
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Offline meteobreda

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #60 on: March 31, 2013, 06:47:40 AM »
I'm sorry  :oops:

Now this could capture ISS America and Europe because works with frequency 868MHz to 915MHz
http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/rfbee-v11-wireless-arduino-compatible-node-p-614.html?cPath=139_140

Thankyou.

Offline rdsman

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #61 on: June 23, 2013, 12:01:49 PM »
DeKay:

I found these and ordered two each:

http://www.elechouse.com/elechouse/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=90_92&products_id=2148

I'll let you know how they work out......

Ray


Offline rdsman

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #63 on: July 04, 2013, 02:57:18 PM »
DeKay:

I found these and ordered two each:

http://www.elechouse.com/elechouse/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=90_92&products_id=2148

I'll let you know how they work out......



Complete waste of money and time!  Using the exact firmware as the RF Bee, it receives nothing from the ISS.  The RF Bee rssi runs around -70, which is 10 less than the console.  If I just let it look for any packets, it does receive constantly.  Tried both of them, gave up!

 
Ray

Offline intra_au

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #64 on: July 30, 2013, 04:47:29 AM »
I've used rdsman arduino library to write sketch displaying the actual data on every packet:
Below is an example of output:

Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 3 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 319 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 4 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 319 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 3 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 3 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 4 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 4 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 3 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165

I can share the sketch if anyone wants it...

I've also decoded packet 5 - it has RAIN rate data, timer that can run up to 15 minutes and indicates umbrella on the console.
MSB is seconds
(LSB >> 4) is a multiplier


Offline rdsman

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #65 on: July 30, 2013, 09:06:57 AM »
Quote
I've used rdsman arduino library to write sketch displaying the actual data on every packet:

Good job!  Are you using the RFBee or some other version of the CC1101?  I've modified the original library extensively.  It now corrects the frequency error on a per channel basis.  I'll be posting the latest version soon.

I did a project that combines the RFBee, SHT25, MS5611 and the DS3231 to emulate the Vue console.  The RFBee runs out of sram before you can make it too fancy.
Ray

Offline DeKay

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #66 on: July 30, 2013, 11:07:11 AM »
Quote
I've used rdsman arduino library to write sketch displaying the actual data on every packet:

Good job!  Are you using the RFBee or some other version of the CC1101?  I've modified the original library extensively.  It now corrects the frequency error on a per channel basis.  I'll be posting the latest version soon.

I did a project that combines the RFBee, SHT25, MS5611 and the DS3231 to emulate the Vue console.  The RFBee runs out of sram before you can make it too fancy.

It sucks that any decently performing CC1101 is tied to a processor so low on resources.  I have been keeping my eye out on a just released module from HopeRF called the RFM69W.  An older module, the RFM12B, was not flexible enough to be made compatible with the CC1101 because you could program the sync word.  I believe after a very quick look that the new RFM69 would work.  It can be bought on a board with an Atmega328 (double the SRAM) for a very reasonable price.  See http://lowpowerlab.com/shop/moteino-R3.

The module can also be bought standalone for an even more reasonable price for connection to the processor of your choice.  This is the route that has me interested.

Offline linuxfreak

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #67 on: July 30, 2013, 10:49:58 PM »
And with a pair, ISS & console replacement?  ;)

Just thinking out loud.  :cool: :-k

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CWOP - DW3112, PWS & WU - IONHAMIL2, AWEKAS - 5112, COWN, WML - WD01901

Offline intra_au

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #68 on: July 31, 2013, 05:18:38 AM »
Quote
I've used rdsman arduino library to write sketch displaying the actual data on every packet:
Good job!  Are you using the RFBee or some other version of the CC1101?  I've modified the original library extensively.  It now corrects the frequency error on a per channel basis.  I'll be posting the latest version soon.
Yep, I'm using just RFbee. My idea is to feed the data to my home automation network via zigbee (XBee) so I can access it on any device and link some actions to it (i.e. close rolling shutters during heavy wind :)
I'll be happy  to get your updated library, the one I'm using loosing the channel sometimes and comes back in a minute or so...


Offline Naby

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #69 on: December 11, 2013, 01:30:58 PM »
New forum member here, I'm resurrecting an old thread. I have a wireless Davis Vantage Pro 2 and I'd like to get the data from it and transmit it via ham radio APRS. I don't have it yet but I will be buying a Weatherlink so that I can get the data on my computer and post it to the web. There is an APRS version of the Weatherlink but I think that it only connects to a TNC and not both a TNC and a computer. My radio is also located away from where I want my console and computer, even if the APRS weatherlink would do both. So I to get data on my computer and send it via APRS I'd need either a second console or Weather Envoy and another Weatherlink module. That is simply more than I want to spend.

So here is what I want to accomplish. I want to wirelessly capture the data from my weather station and then send it to an APRS module and from there to a TNC/radio. I don't have any need to view that data as on a console or save it as my primary console will do that. I figure a Raspberry Pi or Arduino is a good platform for this. There seem to be enough APRS sheilds and stand alone modules around to handle the APRS side of things. I think I would just need to be able to capture the wireless data. I believe that is what this thread is about, has anybody been able to capture the data?

Thanks,
Chris

Offline dalecoy

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #70 on: December 11, 2013, 01:45:38 PM »
WeatherLink software will directly upload data to APRS/CWOP.  And your weather station probably isn't going to change location.

So, if you just want to do this (Davis wireless to receiver to Ardino to whatever), then this is the right thread.  But if you just want to get your weather data to APRS, this isn't necessary.

http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/wxpage.cgi?last=24&call=W5VBQ
« Last Edit: December 11, 2013, 01:47:52 PM by dalecoy »

Offline Naby

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #71 on: December 11, 2013, 01:58:43 PM »
WeatherLink software will directly upload data to APRS/CWOP.  And your weather station probably isn't going to change location.

So, if you just want to do this (Davis wireless to receiver to Ardino to whatever), then this is the right thread.  But if you just want to get your weather data to APRS, this isn't necessary.

http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/wxpage.cgi?last=24&call=W5VBQ

Thanks for the info. I have a Mac and I was planning on using WeatherCat software. I'm not sure is that supports APRS or not but it doesn't look like it. Anyhow, I want to actually transmit the APRS data, not just upload it to the APRS server (just because I want to). You are right that my station will not be moving unless the weather is bad enough. It also sounds like a fun project.

Offline Scott216

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #72 on: July 13, 2014, 07:35:35 PM »
I've used rdsman arduino library to write sketch displaying the actual data on every packet:
Below is an example of output:

Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 3 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 319 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 4 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 319 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 3 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 3 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 4 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 4 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165
Temp 18.4 Hum 67 Wind 3 Dir 283 UV 2.2 SolRad 328 Rain 165

I can share the sketch if anyone wants it...

I've also decoded packet 5 - it has RAIN rate data, timer that can run up to 15 minutes and indicates umbrella on the console.
MSB is seconds
(LSB >> 4) is a multiplier

I'd like to see the sketch you're using for this.  I'm using DeKay's example sketch, but he doesn't have the rain, solar radiation or UV index formulas.  Rain is the one I really need.

Offline DeKay

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #73 on: July 14, 2014, 11:03:56 PM »
I'd like to see the sketch you're using for this.  I'm using DeKay's example sketch, but he doesn't have the rain, solar radiation or UV index formulas.  Rain is the one I really need.

I do rain, but not rain rate.  intra_au was a bit vague on how exactly to figure out rain rate.  I would like to see his code as well.

Offline Scott216

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Re: A Walk on the Wireless Side: Deciphering ISS to Console Transmissions
« Reply #74 on: July 29, 2014, 10:01:08 PM »
Using Dekay's awesome library that decodes the wireless Davis data from the ISS, I've got my project working where a Moteino receives the wireless weather data then sends it up to Weather Underground's PWS.  No Davis console or PC needed!  I put everything on Github.  I've wanted to do this for a long time and I really appreciate the tons of hard work DeKay put into reverse engineering the Davis communication.

 

anything