Author Topic: WS2317 How To Read Wind?  (Read 2347 times)

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Offline ALRUI

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WS2317 How To Read Wind?
« on: August 05, 2008, 09:08:03 PM »
Hi Folks - Newbie here, I've gone through the 2317 manual & I dont see any decent description on ho to "read" the LCD in relation to the wind direction, at different times there are several arrows scattered about the circumference of the wind readout. Can someone give a tutorial of what the arrows are for? I was expecting one arrow pointing to whatever way the wind was coming from.
Thanks!
Arnold In The Smokies

Offline middlecalf

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Re: WS2317 How To Read Wind?
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2008, 10:23:42 AM »
Here's my best guess from observing my WS2317 and it's behavior:  One of the arrows (the one on the outside of the rosette) shows the current wind direction reading (current as in the last reading).  The other two arrows (on the inside of the rosette - one could be lined up with the current reading on the outside of the rosette, giving the appearance of only a single arrow) show the previous two readings.  This would give you an indication as to how much the wind is changing direction between readings, or a "tendancy" for the wind direction.  If your anemometer is installed such that you get a lot of swirling wind (e.g. near a roof top) you'll probably see a lot of variance between the different arrows.  Also, if cabled vice wireless, you'll see more variation as the readings are more frequent. 

At least this is how I intrepret what my unit is telling me.

Offline ALRUI

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Re: WS2317 How To Read Wind?
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2008, 12:35:15 PM »
Sounds like you concur with what I was thinking as well:-) The anemometer is about 5' above the roof line so its not being disturbed by any currents from the roof (at least I dont think so?). Boy it sure would be nice if La Crosse would document this better in the manual but to their credit the manual is a far cry better then any of the Oregon Scientific manuals - those have to be some of the worst I've encountered! I attribute the general poor instruction manuals these days to companies not having technical writers on staff or being to cheap to hire free-lance writers (just my 2 cents).

Arnold In NC