Author Topic: Here's an article on Humidity  (Read 283 times)

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Offline Garth Bock

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Offline havtrail

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Re: Here's an article on Humidity
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2022, 06:17:47 PM »
I've become a firm believer in presenting dew point for the general public, rather than relative humidity. It better represents how the moisture level in the air makes people feel outdoors. I present both, but use a graph that shows dew point temperature on the same chart as the ambient temperature. The larger the gap between the two lines, the less oppressive the humidity feels.

If you look carefully at your own temperature and relative humidity graphs over daily cycles, they can almost appear as mirror images. The temperature rising in midday makes the relative humidity drop inversely, but it still feels just as humid to people outdoors in midday.

Of course, this is my perspective from the Philadelphia area, where weather presenters have always referred to the "Three H's" in the summer: Hazy, Hot and Humid. If you're in a drier climate, it may not matter to your needs at all.

Rich K.
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Offline CW2274

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Re: Here's an article on Humidity
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2022, 06:48:58 PM »
AFAIC, humidity is a useless number unless it's below 5% or more than 95%, and that's just for "show". I even use the dew point inside to regulate the humidity from the humidifier.

Offline ocala

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Re: Here's an article on Humidity
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2022, 04:41:49 PM »
I've become a firm believer in presenting dew point for the general public, rather than relative humidity. It better represents how the moisture level in the air makes people feel outdoors. I present both, but use a graph that shows dew point temperature on the same chart as the ambient temperature. The larger the gap between the two lines, the less oppressive the humidity feels.

If you look carefully at your own temperature and relative humidity graphs over daily cycles, they can almost appear as mirror images. The temperature rising in midday makes the relative humidity drop inversely, but it still feels just as humid to people outdoors in midday.

Of course, this is my perspective from the Philadelphia area, where weather presenters have always referred to the "Three H's" in the summer: Hazy, Hot and Humid. If you're in a drier climate, it may not matter to your needs at all.

Rich K.
Agree with this. It's all about the DP.
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