Author Topic: Heat Dome  (Read 1169 times)

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Offline BlaznDownHur

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Heat Dome
« on: August 19, 2023, 04:59:20 PM »
What are the atmospheric conditions that create a heat dome, and more to the point. What changes in the weather pattern is needed to deflate this heat dome. I live in Dallas and this summer has been brutal so far, wanting to better understand what's going on and what do I need to be on the lookout for to see some relief.
(First time poster. Mods, if this needs to be in a different forum, please feel free to move).

Offline Garth Bock

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Re: Heat Dome
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2023, 10:27:42 PM »
It's been brutal here in Missouri so I changed my pws displays to Celsius.... it's only 40 degrees outside and I feel much better 😁.

Hurricane Hilary is heading towards the west coast (not hurricane Hillary that struck Washington years ago 😆)... and there is a depression heading towards the Gulf so relief might be on the way.

Offline Bunty

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Re: Heat Dome
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2023, 08:08:30 PM »
It's been brutal here in Missouri so I changed my pws displays to Celsius.... it's only 40 degrees outside and I feel much better 😁.

Hurricane Hilary is heading towards the west coast (not hurricane Hillary that struck Washington years ago 😆)... and there is a depression heading towards the Gulf so relief might be on the way.

A bit of moisture from that tropical depression kept the heat down today.  Instead of 104, it was 102.  But with the heat index up higher to around 120, it didn't feel cooler in the least.  Today was the 8th day this summer for the temp to get to a 100 or higher in Stillwater.  Some relief from the heat is not expected until Sunday or Monday.    Hopefully, that will go on to mean that OSU's first home football game won't be played while it's in the upper 90s or 100s.  But, whatever, it will help a lot that OSU's first 3 games won't be played during the afternoon.

In central Texas, they have had it far worse. Austin, TX hit 45 consecutive days of breaking 100F today. The previous record was in 2011 with 27 days. The record making may be stopped tomorrow (Tuesday) due to cloud cover from that nearby tropical storm. 

A change in the jet stream seems to influence where heat domes are going to be.  The jet stream recently returned to near the Canadian border to help explain the current heat dome.  It's keeping the tropical storm just off the Texas Gulf from turning north or northeast.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2023, 08:22:32 PM by Bunty »

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Offline Aardvark

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Re: Heat Dome
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2023, 06:38:03 PM »
Iowa has been no picnic either.  But tomorrow we settle down into the 80s.   With THSW at 135 for most days,  those who have to work outside took a beating in the heat. Many shutdown early, and when someone is paid hourly that can be a bad situation.  Rain is something we are not going to see for the next week, seems to avoid us.  I keep weather records, we average here about 34 inches of rain a year, we are now at 18.18 inches, yet things are growing.

Not much you can do about the heat dome other than try to mitigate it for future years with climate control, but that isn't going to happen, I a certain.

Offline Mikinct2

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Re: Heat Dome
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2023, 03:47:37 PM »
New to weather forecasting-

I understand warm fronts & all but how do
Weatherman predict it'll be 100 degrees on
wednesday if it's only 65 degrees today.

I know one could estimate a warm front might
Increase Temps 5 or 10 degrees but what
Metrics are being used?