Author Topic: A nice tutorial from B & H on photographing lightning  (Read 2182 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DaleReid

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1857
    • Weather at Eau Claire, WI
ECWx.info
&
ECWx.info/t/index.php

Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3302
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: A nice tutorial from B & H on photographing lightning
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2014, 09:39:40 PM »
Yeah, I saw that... wish I had enough energy, time and appropriate cells, to really get to know my http://www.aeophoto.com/LS3ProSpec.html attached to my Sony A65
 

Offline Einar

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 27
Re: A nice tutorial from B & H on photographing lightning
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2014, 06:29:50 PM »
Does it really work?
It seems to detect the lightning, then process it and trigger the camera.
After that the camera will process the trigger signal and start an exposure.
I would think by then the main event will already be over?

If the camera was shooting pictures continously and the device would tell it to save the frame the camera is recording and possible the next one, it would probably work. Is that what it does?

Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3302
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: A nice tutorial from B & H on photographing lightning
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2014, 06:53:55 PM »
Yes, it works!  Seems to trigger either on EMF or sudden brightness changes... Now the Sony A65 I use has a fast shutter lag, about 50ms, and the LS3 Pro has a trigger of about a tenth of a ms.
What happens, if it picks up EMF or Light, it triggers, and the camera, if you're lucky, records any discharges that occur while the shutter is open.  With the standard Sony 18mm zoom lens, it's really hit or miss that the actual stroke is in the field of view...  I'm still practicing with it, I have a lousy location to photograph lightning from, but have logged several good images.... one of which is used on the 'station signals page'... http://frankfortweather.us/BoStaSig/ It's like you turn it on, aim at some part of the sky, let it do its thing, come back, delete the images that didn't show a stroke, and save the one or two that does,.... a helluva lot cheaper than film. And you can watch your favorite TV show while it works.  Or monitor discussion forums... The LS 3 Pro goes through batteries fairly rapidly, uses ŻAA 6 volt batteries which I order for little or nothing through Amazon... 
 

Offline nincehelser

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3337
Re: A nice tutorial from B & H on photographing lightning
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2014, 11:24:03 PM »
Does it really work?
It seems to detect the lightning, then process it and trigger the camera.
After that the camera will process the trigger signal and start an exposure.
I would think by then the main event will already be over?

If the camera was shooting pictures continously and the device would tell it to save the frame the camera is recording and possible the next one, it would probably work. Is that what it does?

It works as Cutty describes... how fast your camera can react can have a lot to do with your success.
 
I have one.  It works, but for me it seems to work better for daytime shots.  If I'm photographing at night with lots of activity, I do better just leaving the shutter open for extended periods.




Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3302
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: A nice tutorial from B & H on photographing lightning
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2014, 03:30:41 AM »
Does it really work?
It seems to detect the lightning, then process it and trigger the camera.
After that the camera will process the trigger signal and start an exposure.
I would think by then the main event will already be over?

If the camera was shooting pictures continously and the device would tell it to save the frame the camera is recording and possible the next one, it would probably work. Is that what it does?

It works as Cutty describes... how fast your camera can react can have a lot to do with your success.
 
I have one.  It works, but for me it seems to work better for daytime shots.  If I'm photographing at night with lots of activity, I do better just leaving the shutter open for extended periods.




I've had little opportunity for daytime shots, but at night my results seem better running ISO 100, at F22/25 and a 5-8 second exposure. The LS3 Pro has a sensitivity adjustment, but I've not used it ... but I will.... I will....
 


 

anything