Author Topic: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor  (Read 2455 times)

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Offline Lucy

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2018, 10:23:54 PM »
Hi, SLOweather

Thanks for your help for the alternate word for mild.
As for the AQI bar graph indicator, Please check this table:
 [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]
And refer to the third column "ug/m3,24-hour average", as I have replied to your first post, this PM2.5 sensor detects the real time PM2.5 content(as the third column shows) while the AQI index (as the first column shows) is calculated with 24-hour average result. That's why the data on your monitor will be calculated as moderate.
In another word, the AQI index does not equal to the PM2.5 data.
Is that clear now?

Best Regards,
Lucy
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Offline Intheswamp

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2018, 10:35:45 AM »
I'm not sure, but it sounds like you're trying to convince someone that the line graph on the unit is labeled correctly, but it isn't.  In progression from left to right it should be something like:

GOOD - MILD - MODERATE - UNHEALTHY - SEVERE - HAZARDOUS

Sure, the word MODERATE may be correct for the last 24 hour average of AQI, but it's in the wrong position on the bar.  If placement doesn't mean anything then you could just as well have it read:

MILD - SEVERE - UNHEALTHY - MODERATE - GOOD - HAZARDOUS

It's the logical progression of the words on the bar that are wrong.  I understand that ya'll probably have a few thousand of these units built with the wrong wording and it's only natural to try to be rationalizing this away, but it won't work, they are simply in the wrong order...MILD and MODERATE should be switched in position.   :-|

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Offline Lucy

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #27 on: August 07, 2018, 01:38:06 AM »
Thank you for your kind response. We'll take your suggestion into consideration for the future products.:)

Best Regards,
Lucy
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Offline SLOweather

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2018, 10:15:32 AM »
It seems to me that this unit detects fog as PM2.5.

I'm currently at 172, while the local AQCD station 2 miles away is at 9.

Offline Lucy

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #29 on: August 09, 2018, 01:57:30 AM »
Hi, may I know what's the source of the fog? Is it smoke fog or just the weather fog?
PM2.5 can be produced by common indoor activities. Some indoor sources of fine particles are tobacco smoke, cooking (e.g., frying, sautéing, and broiling), burning candles or oil lamps, and operating fireplaces and fuel-burning space heaters (e.g., kerosene heaters).
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Offline SLOweather

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #30 on: August 09, 2018, 09:02:02 AM »
To us here on the California Central Coast, smoke is smoke, and fog is fog. We are about 7 miles north and 11 miles east of the Pacific Ocean, and regularly receive marine influenced ground fog or radiational fog.

My sensor is outside. The is summer in the US and California is in the midst of a heat wave. No one here smokes, and we haven't had a fire in the fireplaces since well before I received this unit. I have seen minor increases in the PM 2.5 reading occasionally from fire smoke from the fires burning around the state.

A few days ago, I also performed a little experiment and set the sensor near our propane grill while cooking a cut of beef locally known as a tritip.  Here are the readings from that:

Time (PDT)  PM 2.5
1750             14
1755             17
1804             72
1814             124
1830             26
1834             24
1925             13

The genesis of the fog question is yesterday morning's ground fog, with peak readings of 172 (24hr) and 201 (max since reset). I checked the local AQCD site and saw that their PM2.5 was 9.

Currently, both their site and my unit read PM 2.5 of 13.

http://aqicn.org/city/california/san-luis-obispo/san-luis-obispo-higuera-street/ 

Offline Lucy

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2018, 03:54:03 AM »
Hi, SLOweather

If the fog contains small particulate matter, then the PM2.5 sensor can detect it.
I have no idea why your local AQCD doesn't defect that.
Different sensor will get different results.
We use the honeywell sensor and it's the nearly the best sensor on the market: https://sensing.honeywell.com/sensors/particle-sensors/hpm-series
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Offline wvdkuil

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #32 on: August 10, 2018, 05:18:05 AM »
It seems to me that this unit detects fog as PM2.5.

I'm currently at 172, while the local AQCD station 2 miles away is at 9.
All personal PM2.5 sensors will register fog as PM2.5. Those water droplets are so small that the device measures them.

Official / government AQ stations "heat" the incoming air in those foggy conditions to get rid of the fog water particles.
That is why all devices measure temp and hum also.  Above 95% humidity the current measurements should be discarded.

In my area the morning fog does not last long enough to influence the 24h measurements and therefor the AQHI.
A realtime AQHI does not exist. AQHI should should by definition be based on 24 hour average values.
Weather station owners measure slowly changing weather-values, only wind-gust can vary rapidly. AQHI is also a slowly changing weather-value.

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Offline Lucy

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #33 on: November 22, 2018, 02:02:07 AM »
Hi everyone,

We're working to improve the WH0290 PM2.5 Air Quality now and we'd like to get some suggestions from you to make sure the changes useful.
If you're willing to view the new functions, please check the following:
 [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]
1. The console will display the below after installed battery:
Current PM2.5 readings
24h max PM2.5 readings
Current AQI
24h max AQI
Current colored AQI bar
2. Hold the C/F button to display the following:
24h average PM2.5 readings
24h average AQI
24h average colored AQI bar
3. Short press the Max button to display the following:
1h max PM2.5 readings
1h max AQI
History max PM2.5 readings
History max AQI
4. The word "Mild" will be replaced with "Poor" on the colored AQI bar, because some customers suggested that "mild" is less serious than "moderate".

Please check the attached file to see the layout of the screen.
Please let us know your thought about the new designs, if you like.
Sorry to bother you.
Thank you in advance!

Best Regards,
Lucy
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Online Brientim

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #34 on: November 22, 2018, 02:17:42 AM »
I think that is looking rather good.
Are you doing anything for longer term data retention or integration albeit wifi or USB.
I would also like to consider expansion to multiple sensors or pairing multiple displays and this would require selectable channels.

Offline Lucy

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #35 on: November 22, 2018, 11:33:00 PM »
I think that is looking rather good.
Are you doing anything for longer term data retention or integration albeit wifi or USB.
I would also like to consider expansion to multiple sensors or pairing multiple displays and this would require selectable channels.

Thank you!
For question one: Yes! We have developed a WIFI gateway to connect the PM2.5 sensor to WIFI. And you'll be able to view the live data of PM2.5 and AQI on the APP. Just like this:
 [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]

And if you choose to upload the data to our weather server, you can view the history graph of the PM2.5 data.
You can know more by visit: https://bit.ly/2PRR8zv.

For Question Two: Currently, the product doesn't have this function. I'll ask our engineers whether they could do it.

Any question, please contact us at support@ecowitt.com
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Online Brientim

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #36 on: November 22, 2018, 11:59:02 PM »
Lucy,

Thank you for the response and links. It is good to read that off the mark you are including the global market.

Offline Lucy

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #37 on: November 23, 2018, 10:04:34 PM »
 :grin: Thank you for your support.:)
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Offline weatherstation1

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Re: PM2.5 Air Quality Monitor
« Reply #38 on: January 09, 2019, 01:01:57 AM »
In fact, I am most concerned about the industrial PM particle sensor, which can adapt to the outdoor high temperature and humidity conditions. Is there anything recommend? :grin: :grin: :grin:
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