Author Topic: So, is Beryl a tiny hurricane or a huge tornado?  (Read 148 times)

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Offline Jstx

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So, is Beryl a tiny hurricane or a huge tornado?
« on: July 06, 2018, 05:57:19 AM »
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/?atlc#Beryl

Officially Hurricane Beryl in the middle Atlantic at 10.6N 45.1W was designated with the 500 AM AST Fri Jul 06 2018 NHC reports.
Beryl has a 64Kt wind diameter of between 10 and 20 Nm surrounding a very tiny eye. She's about the smallest one I've ever heard of. Expected to strengthen somewhat, then was progged to have dissipated before reaching the Lesser Antilles; but now probably going to be at tropical storm strength, then with dissipation shortly thereafter.
These type storms often begin regenerating when they get halfway across the Caribbean. So given a possible future path taking Beryl's tropical wave remnants to the Yucatan, a hurricane threat in the Gulf of Mexico is certainly possible, IMO.
Just what we need around here, another Harvey (which had a similar path and genesis). 
(looked for a sat floater image but didn't find a usable one)


500 AM AST Fri Jul 06 2018

...TINY BERYL BECOMES THE FIRST HURRICANE OF THE 2018 ATLANTIC
HURRICANE SEASON...


SUMMARY OF 500 AM AST...0900 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...10.6N 45.1W
ABOUT 1140 MI...1830 KM ESE OF THE LESSER ANTILLES
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...75 MPH...120 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 275 DEGREES AT 14 MPH...22 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...995 MB...29.39 INCHES
« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 06:02:12 AM by Jstx »

Offline vreihen

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Re: So, is Beryl a tiny hurricane or a huge tornado?
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2018, 07:13:41 AM »
My vote is that Beryl is a large waterspout, since it is over the water and hasn't made landfall yet.....  :lol:
WU Gold Stars for everyone! :lol:

Offline Jstx

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Re: So, is Beryl a tiny hurricane or a huge tornado?
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2018, 09:36:32 AM »
My vote is that Beryl is a large waterspout, since it is over the water and hasn't made landfall yet.....  :lol:

Well, technically you're right I guess. But the differences between a 'nado and a (tornadic) waterspout are negligible, since they both form from 'above' and lower to the surface it hardly matters what surface initially.
Yeah, I know 'canes are different animals, or gyres, cyclones, but there are similarities. Given the scale of tiny little Beryl I couldn't resist.
There's also a developing LP system off the Carolinas with a 70-80% chance of becoming a 'formation'/depression in a couple of days.
With the NHC usually very sparing in their progs, these systems often do develop, and usually sooner. So things are hetting up.

(I've seen some waterspouts while out on the Laguna Madre and GOM, from a 350lb catamaran with a (relatively) huge sail area, I sure didn't want to cross paths with them and wind up in Kansas.  :shock:)

Offline vreihen

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Re: So, is Beryl a tiny hurricane or a huge tornado?
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2018, 05:29:01 PM »
I guess that the official answer will come from the National Hurricane Center when they release an advisory calling it an EF-0 and not a Cat-1.....  :lol:
WU Gold Stars for everyone! :lol:

Offline Jstx

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Re: So, is Beryl a tiny hurricane or a huge tornado?
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2018, 06:40:02 PM »
I guess that the official answer will come from the National Hurricane Center when they release an advisory calling it an EF-0 and not a Cat-1.....  :lol:

Tiny little Beryl is actually smaller than some TS supercells, and far smaller than the often severe MCS's we regularly get down here.
Hurricane force wind diameter is 10-20 Nm (with an intermittent eye), tropical storm force diameter from 50-70 Nm; so still a very small footprint.
Wouldn't it be even weirder if we start seeing little micro-hurricanes like Beryl spinning up all over the place in the near future, like your average thunderstorms do.   :twisted:

 

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