Author Topic: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse  (Read 1860 times)

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Offline SLOweather

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3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« on: August 11, 2016, 04:53:08 PM »
I found this while looking for something else. :)



It's essentially a flyball governor, except that instead of operating a throttle, the centrifugal weight mechanism raises or lowers a pivoted arm that serves as a wind speed indicator.

Offline Garth Bock

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2016, 09:31:20 AM »
That is different. Probably can calibrate it pretty precisely.

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Offline Bushman

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2016, 12:08:43 PM »
Rather Steampunk - but cool.
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Offline SLOweather

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2016, 01:17:28 PM »
Here we can use the local Maker Space on a limited basis with our library cards. (Else it's like 45USD per month)

I might have to download the files and go print one of these up.

Offline WeatherHost

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2016, 01:22:59 PM »
What is it made out of?  I've heard the 'plastic' is really some sort of corn goop that may not be too stable for long duration.  Will it be Sun and rain tolerant?

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Offline SLOweather

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2016, 01:59:53 PM »
The page says he used HIPS high impact polystyrene. It implies that you could use ABS filament as well.

What is it made out of?  I've heard the 'plastic' is really some sort of corn goop that may not be too stable for long duration.  Will it be Sun and rain tolerant?

Offline vreihen

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2016, 06:06:23 PM »
Most cheap/home printers use "corn plastic" PLA filament, because it doesn't require a heated bed in most instances.  It turns mushy in the sun, and will not survive even a warm summer day sitting in a closed car.  If you print it, use ABS filament as a minimum.  PLA is only good for Yoda head keychain tags.....
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Offline kd7eir

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2016, 10:28:04 PM »
Most cheap/home printers use "corn plastic" PLA filament, because it doesn't require a heated bed in most instances.  It turns mushy in the sun, and will not survive even a warm summer day sitting in a closed car.  If you print it, use ABS filament as a minimum.  PLA is only good for Yoda head keychain tags.....

I guess my PLA stevenson screens didn't get the memo about turning mushy in the sun. Funny how these hot Arizona summers aren't turning my printed parts into plastic slushies.

PLA is printed at 190 - 230 degrees C, there is no chance of even an Arizona summer melting it.

Now excuse me while I print and distribute the "memo of death" to the approximately 200 people that are using my PLA screens and shelters, outside, in all weather, from Arizona to Alaska, and down under in Australia.

Offline vreihen

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2016, 06:35:01 AM »
The problem with PLA is the "glass" transition temperature of only 131F (~55C), and of course that it was engineered to biodegrade over time.

Here is a pretty interesting web article that I just found, which ironically discusses the pros and cons of using PLA in weather station components:

http://iepas.net/using-pla-for-long-term-outdoor-applications/

My personal experience with PLA is that it deforms (glass transition exceeded) in a closed car during the summer, which is why I would never use it in an outdoor structural application.....
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Offline kd7eir

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Re: 3d printed mechanical anemometer - Thingiverse
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2016, 10:29:50 AM »
The problem with PLA is the "glass" transition temperature of only 131F (~55C), and of course that it was engineered to biodegrade over time.

Here is a pretty interesting web article that I just found, which ironically discusses the pros and cons of using PLA in weather station components:

http://iepas.net/using-pla-for-long-term-outdoor-applications/

My personal experience with PLA is that it deforms (glass transition exceeded) in a closed car during the summer, which is why I would never use it in an outdoor structural application.....

Your experience may very well prove that PLA is not the best choice of material to be left in what is essentially a rolling, sealed oven, but it's meaningless in any other context.

Comparing what PLA does in an artificial enclosed environment, surrounded by glass, known for drastically increasing the ambient temperature, to what PLA will do when exposed to the natural , unadulterated elements of the real world is scientific folly.


"To biodegrade within 90 days, as described, the products have to reach 140 F for 10 consecutive days.  This requires a special facility, which few consumers have access to.  If your PLA products end up at the landfill, they will not degrade any faster than a petroleum-based product."


You can throw all the theory at me that you want, I'm a field research engineer with a Master's Degree, I study the environmental effects on electronics and enclosures for a living. I eat theory for breakfast - PLA is used everyday exposed to extremes of temperature at both ends of the spectrum, and works perfectly fine. It doesn't freeze and shatter in Alaska, and it doesn't turn into a puddle of goo in Arizona.   

I print my PLA at 235°C nozzle temperature on a heated bed at 80°C, and my designs have NEVER failed due to exposure to he elements.

As a side note, PLA is considerably UV resistant.

If you have the time and desire to read an approximately 2,000 word document, I can prove to you why bringing up the "glass transition temperature" of PLA is meaningless in normal, everyday usage. It's a wonderful bit for discussion in the laboratory, but utterly meaningless in 99.9% of real world applications.

From the link that you posted - "Based upon some of the references I have mentioned, I do not think PLA would rapidly deteriorate as shown in a composting situation."

Again, from your link - "the rapid biodegradation often discussed requires a specific set of conditions, which are unlikely to naturally occur."

The paper's conclusion was NOT that PLA was a bad choice for their project, but rather that the author did not have the time to do the testing he would like to do, without delaying the forward progress of their project.

 

anything