Author Topic: Network in Action! NEW  (Read 5962 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DaleReid

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1500
    • Weather at Eau Claire, WI
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #50 on: May 11, 2014, 10:03:20 PM »
Congrats on 43 years!  And never an argument, right?

You must know when it is important to win and when it is OK to let her think she won...

I agree in most part that it really isn't angle as we would usually think of it, but it is really close to what LORAN used to do.  The reason they scattered stations where they could was to provide master and slaves that would give good solutions over a large area.

If one has say, six stations, almost all on top of one another, then the solution for the spherical hyperbolas (yeah, damned round earth) will be poor,  especially at certain directions away from the stations and apparent base lines, whereas if you have the same stroke heard by a different six  all in various areas then the solution is a little tighter.  And as the developers point out in one of their discussions, it has to do with what wave (sky, ground) is seen and even some changes in propagation between here and there.  Not many people listen to AM frequencies at night any more, but the 'shortwave' is still fun to listen to and hear all sorts of things that FM doesn't have with shifts and all.  I doubt that it is enough to make much of a difference, but with the speed of light involved, even a microsecond one way or the other puts the error circle even bigger.

I recollect that the Vaisala network had close to eighty stations across the US, and their engineers tried to pick the locations as best they could for good math solutions overall, rather than just whereever a university or cooperating station would like to pick their setup location.

Great discussion, I am eager to learn more if the developers ever get caught up making fun stuff for us and have time to give a symposium explaining in more but not exhausting detail how it all works.



ECWx.info
&
ECWx.info/t/index.php

Offline corwyyn

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 328
  • Far, far east Mesa, AZ
    • Sleeping Saguaros Weather  Mesa, AZ
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #51 on: May 11, 2014, 11:15:04 PM »
Mike, as always thanks for the explanation.  I knew the system calculations were time dependent but knowing more of the method of how the system calculates the positions is always good information.
Assuming you are referring to the white dot/red circle of the 'real-time' map, the 'relocation' of any dots is actually an artifact of your computer processing the data from the German servers.
Not the 'white dot/red circle' as such.  If you zoom all the way in on the real time map you will see most of the strike positions surrounded by a larger circle centered on their position but with varying diameters (see attached image 'no_MOE_circles').  These rings seem to denote a margin of error as it were for the strike position and based upon the explanation you gave it is probably related to the number of stations contributing data to the network for that particular strike and how confident the system is in the calculated position.  If you notice in the 'no_MOE_circles' image there are four strikes with blue boxes around them (added in photoshop for clarity); at the time this image was captured off of my display these strikes had no circle denoting margin of error, but within a couple of minutes all four strikes had these rings as noted in the second image - again the blue circles were added in photoshop to provide clarity.  For what it's worth on my display the strikes are never white, they range from bright yellow (with the red ring) to darker orange/brown depending on the age of the strikes; the red ring denoting a new strike disappears after about 30 seconds.

Hopefully this helps explain what I was referring to.
Kevin
AD5VG
Blitzortung station 1042

Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3050
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #52 on: May 11, 2014, 11:35:02 PM »
Mike, as always thanks for the explanation.  I knew the system calculations were time dependent but knowing more of the method of how the system calculates the positions is always good information.
Assuming you are referring to the white dot/red circle of the 'real-time' map, the 'relocation' of any dots is actually an artifact of your computer processing the data from the German servers.
Not the 'white dot/red circle' as such.  If you zoom all the way in on the real time map you will see most of the strike positions surrounded by a larger circle centered on their position but with varying diameters (see attached image 'no_MOE_circles').  These rings seem to denote a margin of error as it were for the strike position and based upon the explanation you gave it is probably related to the number of stations contributing data to the network for that particular strike and how confident the system is in the calculated position.  If you notice in the 'no_MOE_circles' image there are four strikes with blue boxes around them (added in photoshop for clarity); at the time this image was captured off of my display these strikes had no circle denoting margin of error, but within a couple of minutes all four strikes had these rings as noted in the second image - again the blue circles were added in photoshop to provide clarity.  For what it's worth on my display the strikes are never white, they range from bright yellow (with the red ring) to darker orange/brown depending on the age of the strikes; the red ring denoting a new strike disappears after about 30 seconds.

Hopefully this helps explain what I was referring to.
Sorry, you are correct. With all the fun, I'd never zoomed in all the way on this particular map! In fact, I thought it might be restricted to logged in members only, and didn't concern myself with it.

 Yes, the orange circles do indicate an 'error deviation'. The 'odds' are that the stroke actually fell within that circle. And as far as I know, the circles are calculated after the discharge is 'located'... it does depend upon number of stations detecting, but also what they detected, and where on the 'what' they triggered... if all triggered on a 'sky wave' rather than the initial discharge, for instance, the error might be greater... If they all triggered at various amplitudes on the same part of the pulse train, then the error might be larger. Of course there are exceptions, depending.

To oversimplify a bit--- If the stations are too far apart, and too far from the initial discharge, they'll trigger on reflected sky waves, rather than the initial ground wave (which has a distance limit) and each reflected sky wave will be distorted differently for each station, so the accuracy cannot be as well defined.

The lightning stroke has what some refer to as a "precharge" before the actual stroke, which produces a train of pulses... ideally stations would actually be running a low enough gain, have a low enough noise floor, in some combination, to detect this train prior to actual flash, thus producing better accuracy also.  One reason for the ideal of "stations 50-150 miles apart"... and operating not for distance, but for quality.  Also one reason they want the E-fields operating under a 300 mile range.  Again, over-simplifying....

Please remember that I know just enough to be highly dangerous!  Plenty of research and study by experts and experiments has been done on this... google various terms and phrases!

Mike
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 11:38:00 PM by Cutty Sark Sailor »
 

Offline gwwilk

  • Southeast Lincoln Weather
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 2224
    • SouthEast Lincoln, NE Weather
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #53 on: May 12, 2014, 08:08:11 AM »
One thing that became apparent to me during yesterday's storm events here is that we need greater station density.  There were many times when I saw lightning flashes and heard thunder, but the strokes didn't show up on the 'live' display.  Is this a major problem?  I doubt it because generally the strokes that do register provide enough information to identify/locate lightning/thunderstorm activity.

I just got mesmerized by the display again and I had to tear myself away in order to finish this...
Regards, Jerry Wilkins
gwwilk@gmail.com

Offline JonathanW

  • Engineer
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #54 on: May 12, 2014, 08:36:08 AM »
One thing that became apparent to me during yesterday's storm events here is that we need greater station density.  There were many times when I saw lightning flashes and heard thunder, but the strokes didn't show up on the 'live' display.  Is this a major problem?  I doubt it because generally the strokes that do register provide enough information to identify/locate lightning/thunderstorm activity.

I just got mesmerized by the display again and I had to tear myself away in order to finish this...

I'm guessing station density is one factor - as the Blitzortung folks note in their project document, the range at which a bolt is detected depends both on the sensitivity of the sensing equipment AND the current in the individual strike.

It may also be that VLF sensing equipment (such as the Blitzortung sensors) primarily picks up on cloud-to-ground lightning--VLF emissions from cloud-to-cloud discharges are much weaker.

A third possibility is there's still room for improvement in the system that correlates received signals from various stations.

I'm guessing the main culprits are #1 and #2, though.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 08:42:00 AM by n0ym »

Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3050
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #55 on: May 12, 2014, 09:37:06 AM »
I still suggest that some of this has to do somewhat with my dubious "Thor's Hammer Slammer Jammer" theory for sky wave signals, (http://www.wxforum.net/index.php?topic=19724.msg190881#msg190881) depending on other network stations' location.

Also,  weaker discharges being overwhelmed by general noise. A signal of 120mv at a station flooded with 130mv signals and noise will not be detected. Observations for nearly a year have shown me that storms/strokes behind a very active storm between my location and their source are sometimes undetected, even though in range of my system... and they are basically the only sources around. Conversely, a very active storm W of me for example, with strong flashes, can obscure weaker flashes from storms E N S of me... happens all the time.

The energy from CG lightning generally is much stronger than IC or CC, true, building high charges from Anvil to Ground. And, according to some experiments, a magnetic pulse no matter what its source,is actually more easily sensed in a N/S direction as it more easily rides in the Earth's magnetic fields! Conversely, EW detection a bit more difficult. Weird, huh.   etc.etc.

Remembering that our systems are specifically programmed with the current firmware, to go "Burst mode" interference at a 30 pulses/2 second average, and "Normal" interference at >15 sigs/min average. If you open your controller's status web page, and watch the "Tracker" section, I believe you'll see your mode etc change from Normal, to interference type off and on depending on storm activity... and if you're in burst mode for a second or two, you'll NOT detect signals... nor will you really know that's occurring unless you happen to observe status either on controller or web... then wonder why strikes are missed.  As I was typing this paragraph, my controller 'burst' twice. I would not have known I was inactive for a total of 6 seconds if that page had not been open beside this one.

Keep always in mind, that this is NOT a single station system! It's about networking. If I'm in 'burst', you guys are supposed to "CMA" for me.. (Cover My Area!) and I'll try to CYA for you in return...

 
 

Offline dfroula

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 543
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #56 on: May 12, 2014, 09:40:53 AM »
While mesmerized by the real-time display yesterday as a severe thunderstorm rolled through my area, I was startled by a lightning strike that hit within a few hundred feet of my QTH. I heard a loud fizzing sound. There was a momentary power failure, my USB hub lights started flickering wildly, and my UPSs took over for a few seconds. After I cleaned up the spilled coffee and changed my underwear  :shock:, I noticed my R820T receiver dongle was only picking up a few Mode-S radar signals. "Darn!", I thought - the LNA and/or dongle is fried!

I rebooted everything, unplugged and plugged the LNA back in and amazingly, all came back to life! The Polyphaser surge suppressor I installed on the rooftop ADS-B antenna seemed to really have done a great job protecting the LNA and receiver dongle! I also have the RG6 coaxial cable tie-wrapped along a 25 foot section of cold water copper pipe, so any serious lighting had a good chance of jumping the coax to the copper pipe.

Later, I checked my .kml files and the lightningmaps.org real-time display. The strike was located at the entrance to my subdivision, not far from the house. I took a drive and noted a fire truck about 50 feet from the indicated location, dousing a high-voltage transformer with foam. The uncertainty circle on lightningmaps.org was quite wide, about 3/4 mile in diameter. The location was dead-on however.

A close call, but a cool validation of the midwest location accuracy with all the new area stations.

Regards,

Don
WD9DMP
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 10:27:12 AM by dfroula »

Offline JonathanW

  • Engineer
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #57 on: May 12, 2014, 10:11:38 AM »
While mesmerized by the real-time display yesterday as a severe thunderstorm rolled through my area, I was startled by a lightning strike that hit within a few hundred feet of my QTH. I hear a loud fizzing sound. There was a momentary power failure, my USB hub lights started flickering wildly, and my UPSs took over for a few seconds. After I cleaned up the spilled coffee and changed my underwear  :shock:, I noticed my R820T receiver dongle was only picking up a few Mode-S radar signals. "Darn!", I thought - the LNA and/or dongle is fried!

I rebooted everything, unplugged and plugged the LNA back in and amazingly, all came back to life! The Polyphaser surge supressor I installed on the rooftop ADS-B antenna seemed to really have done a great job protecting the LNA and receiver dongle! I also have the RG6 coaxial cable tie-wrapped along a 25 foot section of cold water copper pipe, so any serious lighting had a good chance of jumping the coax to the copper pipe.

Later, I checked my .kml files and the lightningmaps.org real-time display. The strike was located at the entrance to my subdivision, not far from the house. I took a drive and noted a fire truck about 50 feet from the indicated location, dousing a high-voltage transformer with foam. The uncertainty circle on lightningmaps.org was quite wide, about 3/4 mile in diameter. The location was dead-on however.

A close call, but a cool validation of the midwest location accuracy with all the new area stations.

Regards,

Don
WD9DMP

Many people consider Polyphaser the standard by which others are measured.  I'll probably be remote-mounting the Blitzortung (controller and all) about 75 feet from the house, and an outdoor Polyphaser data/DC power surge protector will do guard duty on the incoming lines.

Glad to hear you came through the strike OK, by the way - and that the stike localization was accurate :)  As you said, nice validation.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2014, 10:22:51 AM by n0ym »

Offline JonathanW

  • Engineer
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #58 on: May 12, 2014, 03:06:01 PM »
Remembering that our systems are specifically programmed with the current firmware, to go "Burst mode" interference at a 30 pulses/2 second average, and "Normal" interference at >15 sigs/min average. If you open your controller's status web page, and watch the "Tracker" section, I believe you'll see your mode etc change from Normal, to interference type off and on depending on storm activity... and if you're in burst mode for a second or two, you'll NOT detect signals... nor will you really know that's occurring unless you happen to observe status either on controller or web... then wonder why strikes are missed.  As I was typing this paragraph, my controller 'burst' twice. I would not have known I was inactive for a total of 6 seconds if that page had not been open beside this one.

One possible solution to this (perhaps already thought of) would be to make "interference mode" a network-determined (or at least dependent in part on network feedback) condition -- pretty much by definition, interference should be a local affair, whereas rapid-fire strikes would likely hit large regions of the network.

Since the red systems enjoy feedback from the servers, perhaps going into interference mode could be stopped if the server indicates that a station isn't alone in getting lots of rapid-fire hits.

Offline Fox_Of_The_Wind

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 411
  • Hi there!
    • http://www.desotowiwx.com
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #59 on: May 12, 2014, 06:22:36 PM »
Dear Mr. Wind,
Or Fox, if that isn't too informal.

I understand that in Europe, especially Germany where this program got started, there are more stations than beer steins.  I am no expert, just look at my questions, but it is my understanding that the more stations, the better.  If someone is off line with internet problems, with being knocked out by a storm, or whatever, your station might be feeding info the same as another guy a few blocks away until he tripped over the cord.  And while distant strikes at a poor look angle don't get much improvement from a duplicate report just a little ways from each other, at certain angles there is a good contribution to the solution of where the strike is.

Everyone can speak for themselves, but my opinion is that:  More stations the better.  There is an expense but if you fish this pales in comparison to tackle bait, boats, motors, storage and beer.  The kit really was easier to assemble than I thought, but if you have little or no experience, it would be tough to find the place that a ham-handed assembly was botched and then correct without ruining a component or the board trace.  So perhaps in the case of someone anxious about their ability, look around for a local ham and be frank, saying you need some assembly work done, and just because he thinks he's a ham he can do it, I'd ask how long has he been a ham and has he built kits from Heathkit in the past, assembled his own projects, etc.  You want quality help and if you ask pointedly but politely, you are entitled to know how experienced the guy is.  Sort of like asking your surgeon how many of a particular procedure s/he's done.  Your body, you have a right to know, and they expect to be asked nowadays.

I have had so much fun since staring on this project.  Not only relearning the soldering and setup and all, but annoying the hell out of the others here with my incessant questions.  Not only do I know more now, but there is a response history that others might reference.  And almost all the chaps here are wonderful, except for a few and you know who you are, don't you?  JUST KIDDING!

To have access to much of the better detail and zoomability and all is dependent (for now unless the system originators decide differently) upon being an active member.

So don't stand on the outside of the window looking in.  Open the door and come on it.

The more I read about it the more I want to join in.......but as for getting a ham radio person to build my station....hmmmm there has not been anyone around here for HAM radio since the 1950's I belive.....But I have not given up....I do have a cousin that is great at soldering skills....might send it to him...
Like I said I would LOVE to come in....looks fun.

Offline JonathanW

  • Engineer
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #60 on: May 12, 2014, 07:26:53 PM »
One thing that became apparent to me during yesterday's storm events here is that we need greater station density.  There were many times when I saw lightning flashes and heard thunder, but the strokes didn't show up on the 'live' display.  Is this a major problem?  I doubt it because generally the strokes that do register provide enough information to identify/locate lightning/thunderstorm activity.

I just got mesmerized by the display again and I had to tear myself away in order to finish this...

Following up on this - we just had multiple cloud-to-ground lightning strikes here in the Gaithersburg area, with nothing on the map.  Hopefully, once I get my system red built and installed, that won't be a problem anymore :)

Offline corwyyn

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 328
  • Far, far east Mesa, AZ
    • Sleeping Saguaros Weather  Mesa, AZ
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #61 on: May 13, 2014, 03:27:30 PM »
Following up on this - we just had multiple cloud-to-ground lightning strikes here in the Gaithersburg area, with nothing on the map.  Hopefully, once I get my system red built and installed, that won't be a problem anymore :)
My understanding is that local strikes tend to overload the receivers so you probably won't contribute to data in your immediate area, but with enough coverage in the future you should start getting those areas filled in.

On a side note I noticed over the past few days that it looks like they've been making adjustments to the real-time display code; previously I had commented that it took the system a couple of minutes to populate the narrow-field (high zoom) views with the rings denoting the location deviation/margin of error for strikes.  Over the past two days I've noticed that they are now appearing simultaneous to the strike displays.  So another tip o' the hat to Tobi, Egon and the crew!  \:D/
Kevin
AD5VG
Blitzortung station 1042

Offline dfroula

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 543
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #62 on: May 14, 2014, 03:36:15 PM »
Has anyone noticed that the real-time display chews up huge amounts of CPU? There is a warning about this on the popup bubble where station display is selected.

I find that my dual-core Athlon 7550 system running at 2.5GHz is using near 100% of both cores when the display is running.

The only bad effect of this for me is that PlanePlotter (used for tracking aircraft ADS-B transponder signals) can't process data quickly enough from the R820T dongle and dump1090 decoder software. The connection halts and doesn't get re-established until 5 minutes later by PlanePlotter, unless it is re-started manually.

Worth it though!

Regards,

Don
WD9DMP

Offline JonathanW

  • Engineer
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 323
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #63 on: May 14, 2014, 03:38:42 PM »
I haven't noticed it much on an i7 2.4 GHz machine, but it does seem to claim a lot of memory (an ongoing problem in Firefox, not just for this page, but there's also a lot of memory being consumed if I open the page in IE).

Offline corwyyn

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 328
  • Far, far east Mesa, AZ
    • Sleeping Saguaros Weather  Mesa, AZ
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #64 on: May 14, 2014, 03:59:31 PM »
I did notice it bogged down the other night when I had the real-time page running, to the point that I had to close Firefox and re-open it and that's with a six-core processor and 8GB of ram.  Today it doesn't seem too bad but I also didn't view it for very long. 
Kevin
AD5VG
Blitzortung station 1042

Offline W3DRM

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3320
    • Carson Valley Weather
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #65 on: May 14, 2014, 06:43:57 PM »
I just ran a test using IE, FF and Chrome simultaneously on my HP i7 2.80GHz w/8GB of memory. All three are running the Real Time (Beta) display. I can detect no degradation of my system. It is showing around 14% CPU usage and RAM at 68%.
Don - W3DRM - Minden, Nevada --- Blitzortung ID: 808 --- FlightRadar24 ID: F-KRNO2
Davis Wireless VP2, WD 10.37s101,
StartWatch, VirtualVP, VPLive, Win10 Pro
--- Logitech HD Pro C920 webcam
--- RIPE Atlas Probe - 32849

Offline dfroula

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 543
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #66 on: May 16, 2014, 11:09:17 AM »
There is now a full-screen mode available on the real-time display at lightningmaps.org. Nice!

Don
WD9DMP

Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3050
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #67 on: May 16, 2014, 11:50:51 AM »
There is now a full-screen mode available on the real-time display at lightningmaps.org. Nice!

Don
WD9DMP
Also, click on a station dot and go to its info page!
 

Offline W3DRM

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3320
    • Carson Valley Weather
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #68 on: May 21, 2014, 11:28:00 PM »
Some observations during today's storm here in Nevada:
  • First of all - I'm not convinced the line colors (blue & green) are set for >500km and <500km respectively. I'm seeing many green lines that appear to be much longer than 500km in length. That value seems to be closer to 1000km.
  • It would be very nice to have an adjustable "persistence" settings for the strike lines. They disappear too fast to get a good look at them.
  • I would also love to have the capability to play-back the data from time A to time B.
  • I notice a station in Columbia (935) that is regularly detecting strikes throughout the US.
  • We had several strikes within a few miles of my location this afternoon. I detected none of them and, they never showed-up on Blitzortung at all.
  • About 2 seconds before the second bolt was observed, my station went into interference mode. It took another 10 to 15 seconds before it came out of interference mode. There was nothing observed before and after the first strike. The strikes were about 15-minutes apart. No flash was observed for either but the thunder shook the house.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2014, 11:38:54 PM by W3DRM »
Don - W3DRM - Minden, Nevada --- Blitzortung ID: 808 --- FlightRadar24 ID: F-KRNO2
Davis Wireless VP2, WD 10.37s101,
StartWatch, VirtualVP, VPLive, Win10 Pro
--- Logitech HD Pro C920 webcam
--- RIPE Atlas Probe - 32849

Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3050
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #69 on: May 22, 2014, 08:26:06 AM »
Some observations during today's storm here in Nevada:
  • First of all - I'm not convinced the line colors (blue & green) are set for >500km and <500km respectively. I'm seeing many green lines that appear to be much longer than 500km in length. That value seems to be closer to 1000km.
  • It would be very nice to have an adjustable "persistence" settings for the strike lines. They disappear too fast to get a good look at them.
  • I would also love to have the capability to play-back the data from time A to time B.
  • I notice a station in Columbia (935) that is regularly detecting strikes throughout the US.
  • We had several strikes within a few miles of my location this afternoon. I detected none of them and, they never showed-up on Blitzortung at all.
  • About 2 seconds before the second bolt was observed, my station went into interference mode. It took another 10 to 15 seconds before it came out of interference mode. There was nothing observed before and after the first strike. The strikes were about 15-minutes apart. No flash was observed for either but the thunder shook the house.
1) You may be right,.. Tobi is still working on the script, but I believe those distance estimates are the general intent.
2) Tobi even turned off the 'persistence' in an effort to find solutions for some Apple products, and various browsers. It is browser intensive, and a few of us begged him to turn it and transparency back on. He's running a tough compromise right now, I think.
3)I'm not sure that could be possible, at current stage. Here's a quickie, though, if you want to manually do it: http://applian.com/replay-video-capture/download $40 if you purchase, or get a whole buncha stuff for $80. I'm sure there are other ways, possibly even free, but this is a darned handy product I've had for quite a while.
4) Yes, ain't it great? We've stations down in Brazil I'd love to see bounce up their gains enough also, and a couple in the islands... We also need to get some help for old Lonesome Stan Silversword out in Maui...
5) Station density, pure and simple. Rest of us eastward were pretty much swamped with Midwest cells... at one point, running gains near minimum, I was polling over 50,000 signals in an hour... I'm not sure, but I think #of stations currently required to track a stroke in US is 6 so and you were probably too close to count as a station... which gets us to
6) There's a whole buncha stuff in the flash before the actual discharge...  what I call 'precharge'... they're strong enough to trigger interference. If Egon had his way, we'd all be detecting and signaling some of those early events so his algorithms can get a super accurate "Time of Group Arrival".  I notice with my E field, what appear to me more triggers back way early in the "group", but this may be just an illusion, as I've not done that much experimenting with systems....

I do know that those filters Richo and the team designed are really brilliant. All ya gotta do is look at the spectrums compared to just loops. This is gonna help folks with specific and consistent interferences, when the gains and thresholds are fine tuned for their stations.

Have you taken these questions to the BO Forum? Why don't you do that, be interesting to see how my surmises fit the truth.. :roll:
« Last Edit: May 22, 2014, 08:27:54 AM by Cutty Sark Sailor »
 

Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3050
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #70 on: May 22, 2014, 10:58:43 AM »
Don, Here's a full screen recording... click the image, when the page opens, lower right of the player, call full screen...
 

Offline Dr Obbins

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 1148
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #71 on: May 22, 2014, 01:22:09 PM »
4) Yes, ain't it great? We've stations down in Brazil I'd love to see bounce up their gains enough also, and a couple in the islands... We also need to get some help for old Lonesome Stan Silversword out in Maui...
Last night I saw the Brazil station detect a strike ~8,200km away in the north west USA.

Offline Silversword

  • --Stan Y.
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 457
    • Up Country Maui Weather
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #72 on: May 22, 2014, 06:33:53 PM »
Hi All,

Just noticed that just a little while ago that the Station On is is not working for me for some reason.  There are strikes but no lines and no green dots showing up.  I was viewing with FF 29.0.1.

Anyone observing this?

Regards,

--Stan Y.
   KH6HHG
   Maui, Hawaii
Stan Y. - KH6HHG - Maui, Hawaii --- Blitzortung ID: 993 --- FlightRadar24 ID: F-PHOG1
Weather Display 10.37s Build 70
WDL 6.05
MS Windows 7 Pro
Dell Optiplex GX280-Intel Pentium 4 CPU 3.00GHz, 4 GB RAM
Davis Vantage Pro 2+ Wireless
1-Wire Lighting
Webcam: Axis 211

Offline Cutty Sark Sailor

  • WxElement panel
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 3050
    • Frankfort Weather - TwinHollies WeatherCenter
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #73 on: May 22, 2014, 06:36:10 PM »
Hi All,

Just noticed that just a little while ago that the Station On is is not working for me for some reason.  There are strikes but no lines and no green dots showing up.  I was viewing with FF 29.0.1.

Anyone observing this?

Regards,

--Stan Y.
   KH6HHG
   Maui, Hawaii

I think Tobi's working on it. That feature has been off and on all afternoon at times.
 

Offline Silversword

  • --Stan Y.
  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 457
    • Up Country Maui Weather
Re: Network in Action! NEW
« Reply #74 on: May 22, 2014, 06:41:04 PM »
Thanks for the info Mike.

I thought that I was doing something wrong again.

Regards,

--Stan Y.
   KH6HHG
   Maui, Hawaii
Stan Y. - KH6HHG - Maui, Hawaii --- Blitzortung ID: 993 --- FlightRadar24 ID: F-PHOG1
Weather Display 10.37s Build 70
WDL 6.05
MS Windows 7 Pro
Dell Optiplex GX280-Intel Pentium 4 CPU 3.00GHz, 4 GB RAM
Davis Vantage Pro 2+ Wireless
1-Wire Lighting
Webcam: Axis 211

 

anything