Author Topic: Retrieve Data from Atlas  (Read 1245 times)

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Offline kd7eir

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Re: Retrieve Data from Atlas
« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2018, 07:24:02 PM »
If you want the real time data stream it IS locked up. Refusing to let you access YOUR weather data stream in real time for use in any way that YOU see fit is draconian.

They are definitely one-upping Netatmo, the poster child for un-tappable data streams with consumer-grade sampling intervals.....

But isn't encryption the road that everyone seems to be taking nowadays?  Continued gleaning of data from the network just doesn't seem like it's going to be practical in the future as everyone is demanding "privacy".

I have not met one single person that is concerned with the "privacy" of their weather data. That is a nonsensical argument. There is NOTHING related to PII (personally identifiable information) contained in weather data - it's not like the sun embeds the GPS coordinates of your toothbrush in it's rays, or the wind embeds your SSN in each breeze, or the rain carries your bank account information within each drop, or the barometric pressure knows your date of birth...

Offline nincehelser

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Re: Retrieve Data from Atlas
« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2018, 07:38:55 PM »
If you want the real time data stream it IS locked up. Refusing to let you access YOUR weather data stream in real time for use in any way that YOU see fit is draconian.

They are definitely one-upping Netatmo, the poster child for un-tappable data streams with consumer-grade sampling intervals.....

But isn't encryption the road that everyone seems to be taking nowadays?  Continued gleaning of data from the network just doesn't seem like it's going to be practical in the future as everyone is demanding "privacy".

I have not met one single person that is concerned with the "privacy" of their weather data. That is a nonsensical argument. There is NOTHING related to PII (personally identifiable information) contained in weather data - it's not like the sun embeds the GPS coordinates of your toothbrush in it's rays, or the wind embeds your SSN in each breeze, or the rain carries your bank account information within each drop, or the barometric pressure knows your date of birth...

I've met many.  I agree that privacy isn't a terribly good argument for weather data, but the "encrypt everywhere" folks are quite insistent.

Given the half-hearted way Acurite implemented the encryption, it seems more of a marketing bullet point ("Yes!  We Encrypt!") to give people a warm-fuzzy that their data is safe from the evil hackers.

Offline vreihen

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Re: Retrieve Data from Atlas
« Reply #27 on: March 22, 2018, 07:09:01 AM »
But isn't encryption the road that everyone seems to be taking nowadays?  Continued gleaning of data from the network just doesn't seem like it's going to be practical in the future as everyone is demanding "privacy".

Kudos to WeatherFlow for putting the live observations out via UDP broadcasts to the local subnet for any device to pick off without resorting to MitM packet interceptor hacks.  Proof that a vendor *can* make the data freely available locally...if they want to.  I'd be buying whatever Acu-Rite's hub of the week is in a heartbeat if it did this.....
WU Gold Stars for everyone! :lol:

Offline nincehelser

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Re: Retrieve Data from Atlas
« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2018, 08:13:34 AM »
But isn't encryption the road that everyone seems to be taking nowadays?  Continued gleaning of data from the network just doesn't seem like it's going to be practical in the future as everyone is demanding "privacy".

Kudos to WeatherFlow for putting the live observations out via UDP broadcasts to the local subnet for any device to pick off without resorting to MitM packet interceptor hacks.  Proof that a vendor *can* make the data freely available locally...if they want to.  I'd be buying whatever Acu-Rite's hub of the week is in a heartbeat if it did this.....

Or you could just stream the data directly from the device, removing the restriction of having to be on the local subnet to get the data.

There are a number of ways you can connect devices on the network level, but I'll bet most consumers are looking more for some type of SmartHome integration so they don't have to do any low-level programming.

Acurite isn't blind to that.  Why do you think they were in the SmartHome section of CES18?  They obviously know they can't be an island.

Offline gnuloco

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Re: Retrieve Data from Atlas
« Reply #29 on: March 22, 2018, 06:21:32 PM »
I guess I need to clarify, I do not have an uplink to Acurite. My access light is blue but when I try to add my device to the website or App it tells me that I need to have it connected to the internet.

I'm thinking my device ID isn't in the database yet or something.  I have an email into their support, will report back with how I got it fixed as well as what options I have for data from the device or website.

Thanks for your comments!

Offline nincehelser

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Re: Retrieve Data from Atlas
« Reply #30 on: March 22, 2018, 09:03:54 PM »
I guess I need to clarify, I do not have an uplink to Acurite. My access light is blue but when I try to add my device to the website or App it tells me that I need to have it connected to the internet.

I'm thinking my device ID isn't in the database yet or something.  I have an email into their support, will report back with how I got it fixed as well as what options I have for data from the device or website.

Thanks for your comments!

Probably one of the more common problems is mis-reading the MAC label on the bottom of the Access.  Personally, I always take a clear picture of the MAC label with my smartphone for future reference.

Folks often confuse the "eight" and "bee", and also the "dee", "zero", and "oh".  ("Oh" is never used)