Author Topic: How to install the mast for the anemometer?  (Read 337 times)

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Offline meteo29

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How to install the mast for the anemometer?
« on: July 30, 2017, 12:49:21 PM »
Hello,

I hope this is the right place for this question.

How to install the mast for the anemometer?
I bought a wooden tutor of 2m, 4cm of diameter that I want to install on a wooden pole of a carport.
How do I know how many fasteners are required, the length of the fixed part and what is left?

Regards

Offline ocala

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Re: How to install the mast for the anemometer?
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2017, 05:04:47 PM »
Basically you want something that will not sway in any sort of wind. Ideally you don't  want the anemometer to move at all. Think of a flag pole as an example.

Offline lannister80

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Re: How to install the mast for the anemometer?
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2017, 11:29:21 AM »
I'm about to roof-mount my Davis 6250 and I was wondering if anyone had experience with a tripod vs a mount like this:

http://www.ambientweather.com/amwewe.html

I'd like to attach it to my roof (not siding, too much potential for leaks), but will it sway in the breeze?  It looks a lot nicer than a tripod, and cheaper too, but I wonder about it's mechanical stability.

Offline bchwdlks

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Re: How to install the mast for the anemometer?
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2017, 01:06:27 PM »
...
 (not siding, too much potential for leaks),
...

The leak potential will depend entirely on what type of fastener you use to attach. Any mechanical fastener like a screw, bolt, nail or similar is going to put a hole in your roof or your siding. I have always felt that a hole in the  vertical side of the house is less likely to leak than a hole in the roof surface.

The other consideration for a rooftop mount is "how easy will it be to get access to the station for maintenance?" Even 30' feet in the air and 100' away from any trees, it will collect leaves, pine needles, dirt, dust, pollen, spiders, bird poop etc. My rain collector is 70' from the nearest pine tree and twice in a hard windy rain, it has had a pine needle get past or through the debris protector and either jam up the hole in the cone or go through the hole and pin the tipping bucket to one side.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2017, 01:23:22 PM by bchwdlks »

Offline lannister80

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Re: How to install the mast for the anemometer?
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2017, 01:12:59 PM »
...
 (not siding, too much potential for leaks),
...

The leak potential will depend entirely on what type of fastener you use to attach. Any mechanical fastener like a screw, bolt, nail or similar is going to put a hole in your roof or your siding. I have always felt that a hole in the  vertical side of the house is less likely to leak than a hole in the roof surface.

Fair enough.  I'm pretty handy with my simple 3-tab shingles (have added bathroom vent hoods to my roof, replaced a bunch of shingles that were damaged in a wind storm, etc), so that's in my wheelhouse and I'm comfortable cutting holes in it/etc. 

We have cedar siding and I have no idea what it looks like underneath, so I'm afraid (a) I won't be able to hit something under the siding that's sturdy enough to hold this thing up reliably, and (b) it's harder to detect leaks from an external wall because the water doesn't make obvious ceiling-spots like it does coming through a roof, it runs down the walls.

The more I look at this particular mount (the J-one), the less I like it.  People says it's weak and wobbly.  So I think I'll go tripod if I do a roof-mount.

My house is just set up *terribly* for any kind of ground installation, house is about 12ft from the lot line on 2 sides (so it's "in the corner" of the lot), and the parts of the lots that are more exposed at the sides facing the street. 

http://i.share.pho.to/b9814ada_o.jpeg

The green X is where I plan to put it if I do a roof mount.  Right now I have it mounted to the fence on the north side of my lot 12' behind the house (basically there the green X is, but 12' north on the fence), which is not at all ideal for wind.

Offline bchwdlks

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Re: How to install the mast for the anemometer?
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2017, 09:31:33 PM »
Yes I see your point. Try a search through the Weather Station Pictures thread. There is a lot of information that might be able to help you. 

 

anything