Author Topic: StarDot NetCamLIVE  (Read 2641 times)

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Offline Clozzzer

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #50 on: August 05, 2017, 11:18:59 PM »
I tried putting all on sky. That's what I would want exposed correct?

There is a auto iris D.C. Conection on the camera. To bad no lens.

Offline ValentineWeather

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #51 on: August 06, 2017, 08:53:50 AM »
I tried putting all on sky. That's what I would want exposed correct?

There is a auto iris D.C. Conection on the camera. To bad no lens.

It won't work putting all exposure dots on sky. All the stardots I've had need limited sky dots or foreground will be dark most of time.  If you haven't already experimented with the WDR try it.
Randy, the Aviator is my father in 1963 with his Indian bike

Offline StarDot_Dan

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #52 on: August 06, 2017, 02:50:30 PM »
StarDot cameras all have autoiris.  But by default, it's disabled.  You can enable it inside on the misc tab.

Try to stick with sizes that do 30fps if you're using autoiris. The iris itself was originally designed for CCTV (60fps) back in the olden times.  It  just bounces super fast in response to average light levels, you can't actually make it stop in a specific position.  Running it at lower frame rates requires a bit of calculus.  Doesn't work out well below 15fps. Most manufacturers just drive it open in that case, we actually make it work at all frame rates we support.

Images going completely white is likely due to not setting the exposure grid to the areas of interest.  That camera will do 1/50,000 exposures, so it doesn't really need to close the iris.  Autoiris has a main benefit of improving sharpness a bit, since a closed Iris has greater depth of field.  But the truth is, autoiris on most digital cameras is nearly useless, and many IP camera manufacturers just drive them open all the time.  Customer's aren't any the wiser because they're not really concerned about whether a tree 30 feet away has the same focus point as one 50 feet away.

There is the issue of dynamic range however,  which might be what you're unhappy with. That's always a problem with digital cameras.  Some others have a slightly wider dynamic range (like 12 bits max in most cases), but the camera software can't really figure out what to do with the extra range, so stuff gets kind of squashed and odd looking.  Middle range foliage flattens and nearly disappears.

I designed one with a true 16 bit single shot range last year,  undoubtedly the largest in the industry.  I haven't been able to produce an algorithm that takes advantage of it.  There's just too much data, and no way to know what a human would have preferred to see.  More details in the clouds, or more details in the foliage?  Show the sun through the trees, at the expense of details on people's faces?






Offline Bushman

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #53 on: August 06, 2017, 05:49:53 PM »
You need to incorporate a plenoptic image sensor.  :)

Offline StarDot_Dan

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #54 on: August 06, 2017, 09:40:52 PM »
"You need to incorporate a plenoptic image sensor."

I looked into those when Lytro came out with them a while back. The trouble was, a 5MP sensor produced 640x480 images.  And far from in real time, though I suspect a parallel logic implementation would have no problem doing the math that fast.

The main feature they were showcasing, the refocusing,  seemed kind of fake.  Like they were doing it just because they could. Deliberately blurring stuff.

If you close an iris down very far, everything is in focus.  In fact, you don't even need a lens (pinhole camera).  Why is it beneficial to artificially blur things? 

NASA became interested in them, for a news mars rover.  That made more sense, with more information they could produce more results.

I became in evolved in proposals for that camera, but it never panned out for my team.

Mostly now, our future products will focus on smart streaming media cameras.  I believe that's the next cool new digital camera market.   Google is going to offer artificial intelligence analysis on the fly, cameras need to start learning to take advantage of it.






Offline Clozzzer

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #55 on: August 07, 2017, 03:22:13 AM »
Speaking of smart tech, your demos show your logo on the cameras streaming on YouTube. How do I achieve this?

Offline StarDot_Dan

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #56 on: August 07, 2017, 12:59:26 PM »
Adding a youtube logo:

Our current camera won't put one there (adding that to next cam), but you can use youtube to do it, the way we currently do:

Please go to youtube channel setup:
Channel>>Branding

This will allow you to add a channel wide watermark

If anyone wants to put in suggestions for future watermarks I'd be interested to hear.

I'm even hopeing to turn watermarks into "sprites", like in the old video game days.  Have it move around, and be animated.







Offline Bushman

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #57 on: August 07, 2017, 08:39:23 PM »
Sprites.  Please don't.

Offline StarDot_Dan

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Re: StarDot NetCamLIVE
« Reply #58 on: August 08, 2017, 12:32:33 PM »
We kind of have in mind for the camera to eventually entertain viewers by interacting with their chat on youtube.

So for example, you could have someone ask a weather related question in the chat, and the camera would see it via youtube data scraping. Then the camera would try to find the nearest answer in its database. 

I don't know if that needs a little weather man to walk across the screen before providing the answer, but I'd like it to have that ability.

Or, on our list of live views, there's a Lochness monster live stream.  Why not have the monster poke his head out of the water once in a while?

People already do such things using computers with attached cameras. We're trying to eliminate the computer, and give easier access to such customization.

Weather guys interest me, because they often seem to understand scripting.  They're an ideal test situation.