Author Topic: VP2 on a Pennsylvania Farm  (Read 474 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline MisterTwister55

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • Photography by Mike Brulo
VP2 on a Pennsylvania Farm
« on: February 09, 2018, 06:04:01 PM »
Lifelong weather weenie, first time poster.
[/i]

Station: Davis Vantage Pro 2, wireless
ISS Height: 5ft
Anemometer Height: 20ft
Wunderground ID: KPAHUMME12 Orchard Hills Farm
APRS/CWOP: K3TLB
Location: Hummelstown, Pennsylvania
Distance to Console: 300ft?
Internet Interface: WeatherBridge

I just installed a Vantage Pro 2 on a 20 acre horse farm in Hummelstown, Pennsylvania. I wanted a reliable, long lasting station on this property for many reasons. Aside from publishing the data to Weather Underground and CWOP/APRS, I was particularly interested in the micro climate at this location. At 525 feet elevation, the highest point on this farm is one of the highest points in the immediate Hummelstown/Hershey area. As seen in the photos, the property slopes down dramatically, with its lowest point being exactly 100 feet lower than where the station is mounted. Around sunset in summer when there is poor mixing, there are areas of the farm that might be 10-20 degrees cooler. I plan on investigating this with at least one more thermometer and transmitter.

The station will also provide critical data to the barn manager who can make decisions remotely and mobilize her team to bring the horses in if the windchill/heat index is too low/high. The farm can get quite windy and I can confirm that with only 24 hours of data. On what seems like a rather calm day, I've been recording gusts up to 20mph.

I installed the station at the top of the property, as mentioned earlier. It is on a fence post at the very end of the fence, 5 feet above ground. The anemometer is up 20 feet on a self supported taper pole design (I'm a ham radio operator so it's an old antenna mast system). This location is not perfect, as seen in the pictures. It is fairly close to some tall trees which surely block some wind. I wanted to get the station as far from the horses as possible since they could spook from it, damage it with their head/feet/teeth, or poke an eye out on the bird spikes. I'm content with the wind compromise; I could have installed the anemometer on the roof but that would not be an accurate representation of the winds on the ground down by the horses. In fact, and only time will tell, but I think the current set up is more liberal in regards to the wind than it would be if I installed it down the slope near the horses. Finally, the temperature might be a tad warm with it being on the south face of a fence but I'll be more interested in the difference in temperature throughout the farm in the warm season. When compared to other local stations, this is reading warmer at night and higher winds through out the day.

I chose the VP2 because I wanted something accurate and proven to last. I have a vantage vue at my house and I quickly became against mounting the thermometer and anemometer at the same height (my vue rarely reads above 20mph). Further, to say I hate how slow Davis makes advances in their software and hardware interfaces, I would be making an understatement. The newer Ambient stations with built in WiFi make me very happy and hopeful but I was looking for something more robust, reliable, and able to upload to CWOP. Therefore, I have an Ambient WeatherBridge in lieu of a computer with weather link. So far, so good. It remains connected to the internet and doesn't require a computer to be on 24/7/365 and I don't have to make sure weather link remains open on the tray.

It's only been installed for a day but if any of my data is being skewed due to its location, I will consider moving it to a more appropriate spot.

IMAGES HERE: https://photos.app.goo.gl/at8FZIx1BtIUZeUr2





« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 06:07:03 PM by MisterTwister55 »

Offline waiukuweather

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 580
Re: VP2 on a Pennsylvania Farm
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2018, 07:08:23 PM »
I wonder if you should consider moving it a bit further away from the pole?

Offline MisterTwister55

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • Photography by Mike Brulo
Re: VP2 on a Pennsylvania Farm
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2018, 08:28:53 PM »
Yup, I thought about that. Then I thought about all the pole mounters out there  ](*,)

Offline waiukuweather

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 580
Re: VP2 on a Pennsylvania Farm
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2018, 08:42:14 PM »
I was just thinking about either rain shadow from the pole or rain being blown off the pole, and into the rain gauge (ie drips)....?

Offline MisterTwister55

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • Photography by Mike Brulo
Re: VP2 on a Pennsylvania Farm
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2018, 08:46:31 PM »
I understand what you mean. But then I look at the stock photo from Davis which has both the ISS and anny on the same pole. Maybe my photo makes the two out to be a lot closer than they are but it's at least a foot between. I have to think the presence vs absence of the bird spikes has a comparable effect.

If I feel it is an issue in the future, I can very easily move the ISS down 6 ft to the next post.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 08:48:22 PM by MisterTwister55 »

Offline waiukuweather

  • Forecaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 580
Re: VP2 on a Pennsylvania Farm
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2018, 09:16:37 PM »
yeah, you are right about the stock way that Davis has it mounted

Quote
I can very easily move the ISS down 6 ft to the next post.
:grin:
and why not :)

Offline MisterTwister55

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • Photography by Mike Brulo
Re: VP2 on a Pennsylvania Farm
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2018, 09:39:04 AM »
Believe it or not there is a reason I didn't move it 6 feet down. That fence post isn't perfectly vertical lol  :roll:

 

anything