Author Topic: I'm looking for a wired to wireless weather station - Recommendations?  (Read 644 times)

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Offline mslisaj

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I am currently using a Acurite #00594W weather station.  It has wind and direction on one sensor that is mounted high on my shop roof.  The temp, humidity, barometer sensor is another wireless remote that is more accessible in a shaded area.  This station has been in place for 10 years now and has been extremely reliable.  My only issue with it is the remote sensors are battery powered.  The wind speed and direction sensor is in a tough spot to service and while the Lithium batteries last about three years there I'm not getting any younger to get up on that roof.   Also that sensor has been up on the mast for 10 years as explained and while it still works great I don't think it will last for ever and I am thinking about replacing and upgrading my system.

What I really would like to do is seriously upgrade the entire system.  But I would like the windspeed/direction sensor to be hard wired and power down in my shop where it would be easier to service.  The from there it could send a WiFi signal into my home to the display.  Battery powered temp sensors work just fine but I want to put that anemometer up and kind of forget about it.  My budget for this project would be in the $400 to $600 range.  Any suggestions?

Thanks for taking your time to offer your ideas on this up and coming project 

Offline waiukuweather

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the Davis VP station is hard wire to the windspeed/wind direction, from the base station which is then solar powered (and battery back up) and which is then wireless to the display console

Offline alanb

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I will admit that I am completely out on a limb with this suggestion, but if you are willing to run a wire up to your device to power it with AC in your shop, I wonder if a "battery eliminator" product (wall  wart with battery adapter) could be used. I realize you would have to splice in a long weather proof wire up to where the device is mounted, but it seems feasible in my simplistic way of thinking. I am thinking of something like this: http://www.batteryeliminatorstore.com/index.php?id_product=18&controller=product

I don't know how many batteries or what size your device uses, but they make these for various sizes and numbers of batteries up to 6 AA's.

I am just trying to learn about weather stations (before I pull the trigger and buy one), so I know nothing about them. Therefore this may be a ridiculous idea. :lol: And I do realize that even if you could make it work, one drawback would be that you could lose data in a power outage (unless you plugged it into a UPS of course).
« Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 06:45:41 PM by alanb »
Alan

Offline mslisaj

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the Davis VP station is hard wire to the windspeed/wind direction, from the base station which is then solar powered (and battery back up) and which is then wireless to the display console

Dear "waiukuweather",  Fabulous suggestion and I am seriously considering the Davis VP2 as it seems perfect.  The only thing about it and I'm not too sure about is the "rain cup" and what happens when it snows?  Rain amounts is something that I'm not really concerned about but I'm sure I would not be the only one with these in snow country.  The other issue with the rain cup is the maintenance to keep it clean.  But I could install this at the bottom of the mast and it would be easier to service then my wireless anemometer at the top of the mast.  So it's running right in there for serious consideration.  I just need to research the snow issue and the cleaning issue and how often that should be considered.

But thank you for weighing into this discussion.

Lisa

Offline mslisaj

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I will admit that I am completely out on a limb with this suggestion, but if you are willing to run a wire up to your device to power it with AC in your shop, I wonder if a "battery eliminator" product (wall  wart with battery adapter) could be used.

Actually "alanb" this is something I have thought about doing for a long time.  Get the proper wall wart and wire it to the battery terminals and my problems is solved.  Not a thing wrong with that idea.  But, my issue is this Acurite system that I have is ten years old now.  Also the wind speed tops out about 10 knots.  When I know there is more wind then that but I think this is all this unit is capable of measuring.  I am looking at the Davis Vantage Pro 2 that looks like it's exactly what I want.  Looking at the reviews it's a professional unit and while it still has a batter that occasionally needs replacement it would be at the bottom of the mast and easier and safer to get too.  But I have to commend you on your idea as I'm thinking about that too.  Now I just have to decide if I want to take this old system down now and replace it with a newer and more accurate system.

Thank you for taking your time to weigh in on this topic and help me decide.

Lisa

Offline waiukuweather

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yes you can extend the wires to the rain gauge and so have that in a location that its easier to do maintenance
also people have added heaters to melt snow

Offline SnowHiker

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The only thing about it and I'm not too sure about is the "rain cup" and what happens when it snows? 

Just whatever snow you get piles up in the bucket until it gets warm enough to melt.  Shouldn't be a problem as long as you're not worried about accurate readings.  Shouldn't freeze and break or anything.

Or, as mentioned above, you can buy a rain gauge heater from Davis, or look at various threads on these forums where people have made their own.  But from what I've read, they're not very accurate either, I guess a lot of the snow will melt and evaporate before it makes it to the cups.  Plus you'd have to get power to the heater.

Or you can cover the bucket with a small rubber stock bowl, or a dog bowl, or whatever fits.  That's what I usually do as I like to try to measure and log the moisture from snowfall manually.

I can't say how often it will need to be cleaned, depends on how many leaves you have blowing in, insects you have building nests in it, birds leaving droppings...  I'd try to leave it fairly accessible.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2017, 03:19:51 AM by SnowHiker »

Offline mslisaj

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Thanks for the information "SnowHiker".  The reality is I'm probably the only weather watcher that could care less about the rain fall amounts.  So either not worrying about snow build up or covering the sensor are both great workable ideas for me in the snowy winter.  This Davis VP2 seems like a perfect instrument for upgrade for me.  Mounting the anemometer on the peak of my shop like the old one will work nicely,  Being it's wired and comes with a 40' cable gives me options for the ISS and rain bucket.  The building that this will all be mounted on is built on cardinal points and the roof slopes to the east and west.  The anemometer is located on the north peak.  So for the best sun to charge the unit I will have to mount the rain bucket and ISS on the northwest corner of the building on a stand off of probably 12".  This way I would avoid rain and ice coming off the roof and hitting the "bucket" plus get the best angle to the sun for charging. 

With the ideas that have been provided here you all have given me the answers on how to solve my original question.  I thank you all very much.

Regards,

Lisa   :-)   

Offline SnowHiker

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So for the best sun to charge the unit I will have to mount the rain bucket and ISS on the northwest corner of the building on a stand off of probably 12". 
Hi Lisa,

Are you in the southern hemisphere?

Ideally, of course, you should have the ISS (and anemometer, for that matter) as much out in the open as possible, away from the building.  Of course we don't all live in ideal situations.  But if you want to get into even more money you could get an Anemometer Transmitter Kit (model 6332).  I've never used one, but I think you can put it where it's accessible and use the 40ft cable to put the anemometer above the roof, and then place the ISS completely separate.

I don't know what climate you live in, but to me perhaps the biggest shortcoming of the VP2 is that the lower temperature limit is -40 C/F.

Offline mslisaj

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No, I'm in the Northern Hemisphere; north western united states.  So the temps get down to single digits occasionally but teens and 20's are where the winter settles.  Snow happens too but as I mentioned I'm not concerned with rain or water content.  The Davis will work and my goal is to get the wireless/backup power unit off the roof and into a more serviceable area are my immediate goals.  Just have to mount that rain bucket/temp sensor off the side of the shop.  Not ideal but I can mount it about 18" away and it will be serviceable and charge the system.  Compromise is the name of the game here.

Regards,

Lisa